SHORT FILM SEMINAR – December 15


BIG WORLD FOR LITTLE MOVIES

THE COMPLETE GUIDE FOR SHORT FILM CONTENT

The world of short film content has changed dramatically in recent years. Uncover a wealth of information on short filmmaking trends, current channels of distribution and the future of short film exposure from a panel of short film business and programming leaders.

 

Wednesday, December 15

7:30pm – 10:30pm

AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE

Egyptian Theatre
6712 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, CA 90028

American Cinematheque at the Egyptian Theatre

BUY TICKETS

Cinematheque Members:  $12.00       HOLLYWOOD SHORTS members:  $15.00

 

Moderator:

Thomas Ethan Harris
Producer/Instructor
American Cinematheque Film Seminars

Panelists:

Kimberley Browning
Filmmaker & Executive Director
HOLLYWOOD SHORTS

Andrew Crane
Short Film Programming
AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE



TICKET INFORMATION

All Seminars Ticket Prices: $12 Cinematheque Members, $15 Students/Seniors, $20 General.  Order tickets online at www.fandango.com or buy them in person at the Egyptian Box Office.  The Egyptian Box Office is open 1.5 hours before the first program of the day or evening.  In addition to in person and www.fandango.com, CINEMATHEQUE MEMBERS may be purchased tickets in advance by phone: 323.692.3431

HOLLYWOOD SHORTS  DISCOUNT TICKETS
25% Off General Ticket Price for HOLLYWOOD SHORTS participants.
HOLLYWOOD SHORTS Filmmakers will be offered a special $15 ticket price  to our
Complete Guide To The Short Film seminar on Wednesday, December 15th when purchasing SAME DAY (December 15th) tickets only.  Mention HOLLYWOOD SHORTS when purchasing your tickets at the box office for the special $15 ticket price.


SEMINAR OVERVIEW

Whether the renewed vitality of the short film content is based on the rise of consumer “pod casts”, the content crazed appetite of the internet or the internet’s short content offspring – Webseries — there’s no denying it’s a BIG world out there for “little movies.” Uncover a wealth of information on short filmmaking trends, current channels of distribution and the future of short film exposure from a panel of short film business and programming leaders.

The world of short film content has changed dramatically in recent years.

In fact, not since the “.com era” of the 1990s, have we seen such rethinking of how the short film figures into overall landscape of the entertainment industry.

Today there are literally thousands of film festivals for you to consider as you move your short film out to festival audiences.  With cable television exposure for short films part of the distant dream of the 1990s, short filmmakers now find themselves contending with the options of new virtual wild west — The Internet, Video-On-Demand (VOD) and pod casts — for greater content exposure than festival world could ever dream of or deliver.

But don’t stop there!  With the 1000s of internet sites available to you to post your film on, which site is best for your film?  Is it more advantageous for your extended career to “YouTube” or “Vimeo” your short or for you to post your short on your own website and use your favorite social networking site to drive attention to your film?  What is a “torrent site” and how can it figure into the distribution of your short?  How do short film distributors (like Quat Media, SND Films, Shorts International) figure into today’s short film landscape?

Now consider this:  With the incredible expansion of the methods of distribution and exhibition open to your short film, there has EVEN been a revolution in the very definition of what artistically comprises a short film.

What is a “festival” short?  What is the difference between a “Sundance short,” a “Cannes short,” an “internet short” and a “Short Film Festival short”?  What does the Academy of Motion Arts and Sciences look for in a short film?  What is the definition of the most desirable form of content for a short film distributor?

Finally, and most provocatively, is it more advantageous for a short filmmaker today to make a single short (festival) film or to develop and produce a webseries?

For our November seminar, BIG WORLD FOR LITTLE MOVIES:  THE COMPLETE GUIDE FOR SHORT FILM CONTENT, we turn our total attention to unraveling the whole, overwhelming and complex world that today’s short filmmaker must deal with to take good care of their work.

THE COMPLETE GUIDE FOR SHORT CONTENT begins with a focus on issues surrounding film festivals, film festival release strategies for short films, a list of the World’s Best Short Film Festivals (and some not very good ones!) and establishing some definitions for the various forms or identities the short film artistically embodies today.

The second part of our evening’s seminar will be dedicated to an in depth discussion of short film distribution and exhibition. Not only will we open the door to a greater understanding of overall design of the content favored by distributors, but we will examine rights and clearances issues AND help to sort out the vast offerings of the internet and the potential of having your very own web series.

Moderated By Thomas Ethan Harris, Producer/Instructor, American Cinematheque Film Seminars


SEMINAR EVENT LOCATION

The American Cinematheque’s Egyptian TheatreHollywood
6712 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90028

Cheap Parking! The American Cinematheque’s Egyptian and Spielberg Theatres validate only for HOLLYWOOD AND HIGHLAND, $2 for 4 hours (each additional 20 minutes is $1.)   LA Film School Lot, 6363 West Sunset Boulevard (enter on east side of Ivar, north of Sunset).  $5  Lot closes at 1am.

Please visit our website for more information www.americancinematheque.com

Join the American Cinematheque on Facebook www.facebook.com/EgyptianTheatre

Follow the American Cinematheque on Twitter @sidgrauman

Please direct inquiries on the American Cinematheque Film Seminar Series to Seminar Producer/Instructor:  Thomas Ethan Harris Email Thomas

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